Our English Heritage

Our ancestor Elizabeth Jarvis was likely from England, likely a Quaker, and likely immigrated to Pennsylvania around 1682. She had two children. Her husband likely died on the voyage to Pennsylvania or shortly after arrival.

This statement began our journey of discovery of our English heritage. Look again at the problem statement. It’s remarkable that we succeeded.

Think of the stories we’ve uncovered and the people we’ve met.

A chance encounter introduced us to Celia Cotton, without whom this story wouldn’t have a happy ending. Celia worked tirelessly, researching stories of Jervis and other families. She always wants to turn over the next rock to see what’s under it.

And then we met Louise Jervis Longworth. She’s fun, she’s interesting, and she’s our cousin. Her family DNA provided a most important link. And Louise connected with more of her own family during the journey.

And, of course, we’ve gotten to meet our grandparents and get to know them a little better.

We’d find a parish record of their birth or baptism, and we’d feel we were there. We can imagine the rector, maybe J.A. Wedgwood, blessing the baby.

The record lists the parents’ names – great, these are grandparents we didn’t know before.

What say, they’re from Maerway Lane? Where’s that? Look, that’s their house and farm on this old map.

A death citation and maybe an inventory of their goods and chattels. A looking glass. I wonder if that was a prized possession.

And now and then, an illegitimate child or an encounter with the law or courts. That’s family too.

We’re at a brick wall with John and Elizabeth Jervis (8G). We can’t find their parents. And we’re at a brick wall with Louise’s family at Thomas and Margaret Jervis (8G).

So there’s more to be done. We’ll leave it to the next generation of Jervis genealogists to continue researching.

And to feel that special feeling when you find your ancestors and how they lived and worked and died.

Goodbye English grandparents. We’ll take up your stories in America.


Sources

  • Various images and clip art – attributed in earlier posts

2 thoughts on “Our English Heritage

  1. Louise Longworth July 19, 2020 / 7:01 am

    Hi Mark – Loving the story ! Elizabeth must have been quite a gal !

    You must be pretty darned proud to be a descendant ?

    Really looking forward to the rest of her story through to Kansas.

    Louise.

    Like

  2. Mark Jarvis July 19, 2020 / 4:21 pm

    Thanks Louise,

    I agree, Elizabeth must have been something.

    Thanks for your fun help and support.

    Mark

    Like

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